Treatment & Procedures


Ischemic Stroke
An Ischemic Stroke is the result of an inadequate supply of blood and oxygen to the brain
Learn More

Ischemic Stroke
©2006 National
Stroke Assoc.

Hemorrhagic Stroke
Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a blood vessel bursts in or around the brain. While less common than Ischemic strokes, hemorrhagic strokes are more deadly.
Learn More

Hemorrhagic Stroke
©2006 National
Stroke Assoc.
 

About Ischemic Stroke


Ischemic Stroke | Learn more about treatment options
An Ischemic Stroke is the result of an inadequate supply of blood and oxygen to the brain. Approximately 80 percent of strokes are ischemic. There are two types of ischemic strokes:
Thrombotic Stroke
Thrombotic
Embolic Stroke
Embolic



Thrombotic (cerebral thrombosis)
In a thrombotic stroke, a blood clot or thrombus forms in one of the brain's arteries and blocks the flow of blood to the brain. The cells in the affected area stop functioning and die quickly.
Embolic (cerebral embolism)
An embolic stroke occurs when a blood clot travels through the heart and lodges in a brain artery, impairing the flow of blood to the brain.

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) occurs from a thrombus or embolus that temporarily interrupts blood flow to a portion of the brain. TIA Symptoms occur in one third of stroke victims prior to the actual stroke. TIA should be considered as seriously as stroke.
Ischemic Stroke
Ischemic Stroke
VIEW MOVIE
(3 MB avi)